The Beaches

"The beaches are covered with sea-shells white
When the tide runs out sea-grasses wave and beckon you in.
The shadow people live there, it is said -
Shadow people one cannot see until the sun is up
To cast their shadows on the sands of sea-shells white."
George Clutesi

© TS Ni hUiginn

Eagle Family Hunting on the Salish Sea

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.

-Alfred, Lord Tennyson

This family of Eagles were on the hunt down by the salty sea one summery day when I happened upon them not long ago. The lone eaglet was being tutored in the art of fishing salmon from above. They swirled, flapped and swooshed on their magnificent wings, diving down with incredible speed and skill, it was utterly thrilling for those of us witnessing the event from the solid ground.

Unfortunately their hunt was unsuccessful, which is more often than not the case when it comes to hunting. Exhausted from their efforts they all took to the beach to chill out and regain their energy. The Eaglet who had been resting near their father on the beach soon grew restless as his or her growing body was still eager to move so they took to his wings to explore and perhaps find a snack to bring back to their folks. Dad continued to chill, albeit alert less a convenient meal made it self known. The passing heron was far too large to get proper hold off and dispatch so it was left to go on its way.

Mother Eagle sat by herself on a larger rock not far from her Husband and Son, and kept watch from her higher vantage point. For those of you who are unfamiliar with eagles and how to tell their sex, it is quite simple much like with human beings except opposite because when it comes to eagles the females are noticeably larger and stronger than the males are. Not being in possession of a telephoto lens I had to apply the much more time consuming, traditional method of creeping and stalking to get close enough to the Matriarch to get these photos. Fortunately she did not fly off when I got close, which is more often the case than not, she was not distressed by my presence and I focused my lens on her. When I first saw her deformity I was distressed, and admittedly also a bit disappointed that this was not a perfect Eagle and was concerned as to how that would effect my photo. These thoughts were fleeting though because upon reflection it occurred to me that something about this magnificent Matriarch was very familiar to me.

You see my Great Grandmother was afflicted by the lack of her nose due to cancer and I never knew her when her face was fully intact. Despite this affliction my dear, tiny, Granny held her head high and walked and functioned fully in society, she was never ashamed and no one looked down on her. And why should they, she not only survived cancer, lived through two world wars and the great depression, raised a family, owned her own homes, out lived two husbands and both of her sons. She began work as a young girl to help provide financially for her family and was very proud of her contributions, she passed away peacefully two months before what would have been her one hundredth birthday. She was a matriarch, a real woman and not a caricature of femininity, she was truly beautiful and wise, hard working and honest, loving and kind. No one was repulsed by her, she always had a steady stream of visitors eager to hear her for a cup of tea and to share some good stories. Although I lost Grandma years ago when I was still a young woman, within that Eagle her soul remained intact and they were one if only in my mind, it was a profound moment of clarity.

That Eagle is not inferior or defective due to her affliction she is in fact superior, a survivor who wears her scar proudly like a warrior should and continues on. Neither was Grandma, she was an incredible human being and woman, and now dozens of her great, great, grandchildren all are fortunate enough to carry her precious powerful bloodline and strength that comes with it. And in that moment I was reminded of our power, the power of nature throughout our history and ancestors and sometimes we all need to be reminded of reality. Especially in these troubled times when we are being subjected to steady streams of siren songs luring us to our doom with their dehumanising messages. They condemn us for being born; for remaining natural, for being our sex, for being of our racial or cultural origins, for how we look or don’t look. They condemn us for wanting to be able live the same way in the same culture our parents and grandparents did and be able to provide for ourselves like adult humans are meant to instead of being the victims they want. Do not mind the sirens song, listen instead to the Eagles and nature, embrace your ancestors and the fact that you, like your ancestors are also a capable, natural, powerful human beings!

© TS Ni hUiginn

Upon Reaching the Top of the Mountain

Upon Reaching the top of the mountain,
After so much effort, sacrifice and toil,
You might find it isn't what you imagined it would be.
Upon Reaching the pinnacle of success,
After so many failures, obstacles and pain,
You just might find yourself staring longingly at where you used to be.
There are no guarantees that the flowers are any sweeter, lusher or brighter than the flowers are where you are now and entertaining such thoughts only invites unhappiness.

Consider that perhaps it is neglect that may be the only reason your flowers are not blooming and that theirs are because of their hard work and effort. Try instead to tend your own flowers instead of coveting someone else's, you just might be surprised by the results. 

Learning to love and accept yourself for who you are while you develop the talents your ancestors gave you is the simplest and natural way to find contentment and peace. Futilely striving to be somebody or something that you are not capable of, that is embracing misery.

Hunting the Hunter

"places to hunt places to hide are getting harder to find, and pet canaries and goldfish too, did you notice that?" - Charles Bukowski
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn

The Great Blue Heron is a patient hunter, slowly gliding though the water watching and waiting for the perfect moment to strike. It is quite exciting to come across a Heron going about its business, which is usually eating or sleeping and sometimes grooming.

  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn

It takes a lot of fish to fill up one of these massive birds, and not just fish. Basically anything small enough to fit down its throat will be consumed, so be warned when photographing these beautiful birds.

  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Great Blue Heron taken with Olympus Evolt E-300 by Coastal Salish Photographer TS Ni hUiginn

In order to photograph a hunting Heron you have to move a stealthily and slowly meditatively and with purpose, as they do. There is something magical about witnessing this gorgeous bird going about its business naturally, without the slightest clue it was also being hunted. Fortunately for it I was only hunting for its beauty with my camera lens. Although it was a lot of fun, I too grew hungry and decided to call it a day. The Heron, also still hungry was still hunting when I left and it is very likely that he or she is still hunting now.

From Salish Sea to Salish Skies

“Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.” 
― William Butler Yeats
  • Snowy Peaks behind Island taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Snowy Peaks taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Snowy Peaks taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Snowy Peaks behind Island taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn
  • Snowy Peaks behind Island taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn

Although I could never do the mountains justice or capture their full beauty, I would like to share these images of some sites that never fail to take my breath away and humble me all at once. To see the land from the sea is an incredible experience, and when I do I cannot help to feel that everyone she be able to take in these breathtaking sites.

Being Erased

This is for the people who are suffering in the DTES and beyond, for the homeless, the vulnerable, the sick, the elderly, the veterans, the workers, the used and abused whose suffering and hardship has too long been ignored.

Erased on Hastings Street, British Columbia, a photo illustration by TS Ni hUiginn
This image of the DTES is from my archive
 Being Erased,

Being Ignored,

Being vulnerable and ill and violated and abused by those who are responsible for your protection and care.
Erased in Vancouver, British Columbia, a photo illustration by TS Ni hUiginn
This image of the DTES is from my archive
We know how it began,

the question is

Why doesn’t it end?
Erased at Vancouver Art Gallery, British Columbia, a photo illustration by TS Ni hUiginn
We are all in the same boat,
don't feel left out,
 your turn will soon come.
Erased in Victoria British Columbia, a photo illustration by TS Ni hUiginn

With protectors like these who needs enemies.

Betwixt and Between

Betwixt and Between
Inclemently Obscene.
Sun, Sleet or Snow,
Who is to know?
  • Melting snow taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Melting snow taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Hail taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Hail taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Melting snow taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Melting snow taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!
  • Fresh falling hail taken by Salish photographer TS Ni hUiginn!

Spring is the most diverse of season’s, as winter battles to hold on the new buds fight back with their instinctive longing to survive. They will persevere and survive, that is natural and we all have these strengths during times of great adversity.